Substitution

In hanging on the cross, Jesus was our substitute. He was without sin. We are not. It is sin that deserves the punishment of death (Romans 6:23). Jesus took on our sin and died in our place – substituting His own body in place of ours. This concept is  important because Jesus is the only man (of course He is God too) whose perfect, sinless life was sufficient to pay for the sins of the world. The good news is that He did it and that God’s righteous judgment is still intact because His just demands have been met.

This concept is clear throughout Scripture:
Isaiah 53 –  But he was pierced for our transgressions, he was crushed for our iniquities;the punishment that brought us peace was upon him, and by his wounds we are healed.

1 Peter 2:24 – He himself bore our sins in his body on the tree, so that we might die to sins and live for righteousness; by his wounds you have been healed.

Matthew 20:28 – . . .the Son of Man did not come to be served, but to serve, and to give his life as a ransom for many.

I Timothy 2:6a – who gave himself as a ransom for all men. . .

Galatians 3:13a – Christ redeemed us from the curse of the law by becoming a curse for us. . .

2 Corinthians 5:21 –  God made him who had no sin to be sin[1] for us, so that in him we might become the righteousness of God.

1 Peter 3:18a – For Christ died for sins once for all, the righteous for the unrighteous. . .

How does this concept impact my life? In every way. I live because Christ died in my place. He took on my sin – it is no longer my burden. It has been paid for by Jesus’ own blood. He has conquered death and brought me into the family of God. In this life and beyond I will enjoy the favor of a Father who is God. It’s a classic statement, but appropriate here – Because He died for me, I choose to live for Him! I’ll never be able to substitute myself for Him, but He has called me to try – to work on becoming like Him and to then represent Him to the world. It’s an incredible privilege that I’m honored to be a part of.

(Info from “The Moody Handbook of Theology” by Paul Enns, pg 323)

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